RALLY OVER UNC CONFEDERATE STATUE

CLICK TO WATCH THE VIDEO ON WSVN.COM

August 22, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-08-29 at 1.41.55 AM.png

((BELKYS NEREY))

NEW TONIGHT — A TENSE STANDOFF AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA IN CHAPEL HILL.

PROTESTERS CHANTING FOR THE REMOVAL OF A CONFEDERATE STATUE.

((VO))

SEVERAL HUNDRED DEMONSTRATORS DEMANDING THE STATUE BE REMOVED FROM CAMPUS — MANY SEEN CARRYING BANNERS, MARCHING THROUGH THE STREETS.

U-N-C SAYS THEY WANT TO REMOVE THE MONUMENT, BUT THEY’RE RESTRICTED FROM DOING SO BY STATE LAW.

POLICE WATCH FROM BEHIND TEMPORARY METAL BARRIERS CIRCLING THE STATUE KNOWN AS THE CONFEDERATE SOLDIER SILENT SAM.

THE STATUE STANDS IN HONOR OF STUDENTS WHO DIED IN THE CIVIL WAR.

AT LEAST ONE PROTESTER HAS BEEN HAULED AWAY BY OFFICERS.

DEMONSTRATORS RESPONDED BY CHANTING FOR HIS RELEASE.

((ON-CAM))

THIS RALLY JUST A SHORT DRIVE FROM DURHAM, WHERE A STATUE OF CONFEDERATE GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE WAS TORN DOWN BY PROTESTERS LAST WEEK.

 

Building a Strong Resume

Screen Shot 2017-07-20 at 1.08.28 PM

I created this interactive resume on a very intuitive design website called canva.com. Immediately loving the template (it fit perfectly with my green/black/dark gray color scheme), I was ready to pay whatever necessary to use the design. To my surprise, it was one of their free templates!

If you take a look, you’ll realize that the design is atypical to what an employer might get sent from HR. It may seem obvious to someone reading this, but I had never considered sending a resume in pdf format. What this allows me to do, is create hyperlinks for an employer viewing my resume on a computer (as most do these days). I immediately link to my online portfolio here on TaylorCraigMedia.com and point out the fact that it’s clickable.

Screen Shot 2017-07-19 at 3.05.11 PM.png
I hope nobody finds that patronizing!

Another strong I aspect I was proud to have thought of is my “Software Competency” section. This is usually represented within the skills section, but I often found those to be redundant. If I say I’m proficient in Adobe Premiere CC, it would be redundant to also mention that I’m a skilled video editor in the same section. Of course, going this route runs the risk of an employer being unfamiliar with the software, but, frankly, they should be aware of a candidates software competence, and inevitably, be able to identify said software. I included the professional skills section to clear up any misconceptions, as well as, list skills that might not have a particular software associated with them.

Another omittance is a “Personal Skills” section. For the sake of space, I decided to express details of my character through quotes from recommendation letters I was honored to receive. I am a journalist after all.

“Few routinely display Mr. Craig’s inquisitiveness and analytical approach. Moreover, Taylor never hesitated to voice well- founded dissent from majority opinion — even when mine was in the majority.”  — Kevin M. Petrich, Ph.D.

Both Kevin M. Petrich, Ph.D. and Stephen Charbonneau Ph.D. spoke very kindly of me in their letters. My belief is that, even on a resume, it may be seen as pretentious to brag about your character. While maintaining what humility you can afford on a resume, I decided having professionals held in high-esteem speaking on your behalf is the best way to convey your personality and work ethic — and finding a way to communicate your personality on a resume is vital.

The most important part of your resume is experience, which is why I allow that section to dominate my resume. Not to get too detailed, but I made a point to accompany each bullet point with a verb that represented an action. If you look at the first word of my current job’s duties, I lead with “Write, Build, Research, Navigate…”. Not only are these strong action verbs, but I’m using them in the present-tense because… I presently work at Channel 7. Makes sense, right? For all of my past work, I used verbs in the past-tense.

At the very top, I have my all-encompassing statement to describe myself.

I’m a high-energy storyteller with an insatiable hunger for delivering news through a variety of media. My most deeply held values are honesty, effort, and maintaining a positive attitude.

This is important, not only for me as a writer, to convey my beliefs precisely, but for anyone who wants to be taken seriously from the very start — and knows their worth.

Comment below! Open to any and all criticisms!

Article: FAU hosts Presidential debate viewing parties, race relations debated among students

The Burrow, a bar and grill on Florida Atlantic’s Boca Raton campus, was filled with about 150 people Monday night as students of differing political backgrounds sat down to watch the first presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Black Greek letter organizations Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Phi Alpha and NAACP at FAU hosted the event at the campus bar, which was attended by both the College Democrats and College Republicans.

Catherine Theriault, the president of College Democrats, said the matchup was drawing so much attention because of the contrasts between the candidates.

“I think it’s because they have two completely different temperaments so it’s going to be exciting to see them go face to face,” she said. “I think Donald Trump has his own style and you can never really prepare for that.”

After the debate ended and the crowd at The Burrow thinned out, another debate formed between Justin Atkins (Vice President of the College of Democrats) and Andrew Paz (Communications Manager of the College Republicans). Photo by Max Jackson.

The crowd had impassioned reactions to the debate as members of College Democrats and College Republicans engaged in heated discussions regarding race relations with law enforcement at the event’s conclusion, the first of three scheduled presidential debates.

“You all are statist sheep,” Alan Friederwitzer, a Bernie Sanders supporter, interrupted. “Down with the state! Anarchy!”

The scene was calmer across campus at Living Room Theaters, where Stephen Heidt, an assistant professor in the FAU School of Communication and Multimedia Studies, moderated a post-debate discussion among members of the audience.

“I think what [Trump] had to do to win the debate was look presidential, look in control and I think he did anything but that,” Bruce Feldman, an FAU alumni, said during the discussion.

The 90-minute, commercial-free melee allowed for a barrage of exchanges with two cameras fixed on the candidates.

After remarking on the multiple decades Clinton has spent in public office, Trump asked her, “Why are you just thinking of all of these solutions now?”

The Burrow was filled with audible disbelief from Clinton supporters and laughter and clapping from Trump supporters.

Clinton fired back when Trump mocked her for staying home and preparing for the debate while he campaigned.

“I’ve also prepared to be president and I think that’s a good thing,” Clinton said. The Burrow responded to the jest with applause.

While many viewers tuned in for entertainment value, several students like freshman English major Samiha Hossain found the debate lacking in substance on important issues.

“I don’t think they’re answering any of the questions,” Hossain said. “It’s like they’re trying to come up with the best comebacks, they’re not addressing anything.”

At Living Room Theaters, one of the loudest jeers in the crowd came when Trump said he has formed a good relationship with African Americans.

The NAACP of FAU was in attendance at The Burrow and participated in applauding Clinton for saying the country needs to address systemic racism.

In the latest Quinnipiac University poll, Trump trails Clinton 66-24 among non-white voters, while Trump leads Clinton 50-44 among white voters when in a four-candidate race.

Luke Turner, the director of political affairs for the College Democrats, found the event a great way to discuss political ideas centering around race.

“I’m looking forward to talking more about the obstruction of racism within our police jurisdiction,” Turner said. “I feel like we need to really talk more about educating people, more so our police officers on how to de-escalate something.”

Justin Atkins, the vice president of the College Democrats, was seen debating the racial discrimination of stop-and-frisk policies with Andrew Paz of the College Republicans. Atkins said he felt like Trump dodged a question on race relations.

“He rerouted that question to focus on black-on-black crime in Chicago,” he said. “Instead of focusing on how we can overcome police brutality, training, community policing, he focused on blacks killing blacks.”

There has not been an on-campus viewing party announced yet for the next debate on Oct. 9.

Amber Ali and Thomas Chiles contributed reporting to this story.

Taylor Craig is the lead video journalist with the University Press. For information regarding this or other stories, email taylorcraig634@gmail.com or tweet him @taylorcraig.

Doug Oberman, a senior public safety/ law enforcement major, argues against the opinions of two students from the College Republicans about recent police shootings and several other topics. Photo by Max Jackson.

During the impromptu student debate, FAU Police officers were called to the scene to make sure the discourse remained civil and non-violent. Photo by Max Jackson.

 

Full Article with photo gallery on the University Press Website: http://www.upressonline.com/2016/09/campus-hosts-pair-of-viewing-parties-for-first-presidential-debate/